sofia violet



Apr 04 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Submission: Hamburger Hochbahn Ceiling Map, 1915
Submitted by themallefitz, who says: 
This is a transit map of the Hamburger Hochbahn (subway / elevated railway) from 1915. it was painted on the ceiling of the wagons.
——
Transit Maps says:
This. Is. So. Beautiful.

transitmaps:

Submission: Hamburger Hochbahn Ceiling Map, 1915

Submitted by themallefitz, who says: 

This is a transit map of the Hamburger Hochbahn (subway / elevated railway) from 1915. it was painted on the ceiling of the wagons.

——

Transit Maps says:

This. Is. So. Beautiful.

Apr 03 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Isometric S-Bahn Map, Stuttgart, 2007
Really?
After all this time running this blog, only now do I find out that the incredible isometric Stuttgart U- and S-Bahn map (October 2011, 5 stars) has an S-Bahn-only sibling?
If anything, this is actually even better than that map: fewer route lines leads to more graphical simplicity. Like that map, however, it’s since been replaced with something disappointingly normal.

(Source: shelbycearley/Flickr)

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Isometric S-Bahn Map, Stuttgart, 2007

Really?

After all this time running this blog, only now do I find out that the incredible isometric Stuttgart U- and S-Bahn map (October 2011, 5 stars) has an S-Bahn-only sibling?

If anything, this is actually even better than that map: fewer route lines leads to more graphical simplicity. Like that map, however, it’s since been replaced with something disappointingly normal.

(Source: shelbycearley/Flickr)

Mar 03 Reblogged

transitmaps:

(Back in) Time Tunnel
I love it when people find old transit maps still in situ at stations. This Northern Line map at Embankment dates from sometime prior to 1999 (the year that the Jubilee Line platforms at Charing Cross closed), but is still in place today — this photo was taken on February 21, 2013.
Note also the beautiful 1914 green glazed tiles next to the map.

(Source: stavioni/Flickr)

transitmaps:

(Back in) Time Tunnel

I love it when people find old transit maps still in situ at stations. This Northern Line map at Embankment dates from sometime prior to 1999 (the year that the Jubilee Line platforms at Charing Cross closed), but is still in place today — this photo was taken on February 21, 2013.

Note also the beautiful 1914 green glazed tiles next to the map.

(Source: stavioni/Flickr)

Nov 15 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Moscow Metro, 1980
Here’s a beautiful map of the Moscow Metro from 1980 that’s unlike anything else I’ve ever seen. I don’t think it’s an official map, as it looks quite different to other Moscow maps of the same vintage. The archive I found the map in also lists it as “Source Unknown”. It appears to have been printed on the flyleaf of a pocket-sized book, bound to the book’s front cover on the left half, with the fold just to the right of the vertical Orange Line of the map.
Have we been there? No.
What we like: One of the most unique-looking transit maps I’ve ever seen. It looks more like a map of the solar system, with Jupiter-sized interchange stations within the orbit of the Ring Line, smaller satellites (outlying stations) trailing along in their wake. Despite the unusual form, and the renowned complexity of the Moscow system, this still has a nice sense of clarity, simplicity and order to it - this map is still very usable.
What we don’t like: Some absolutely terrible registration on the printing (which appears to be all spot colours - nine different colours in total!). Some fairly crude-looking linework, which may be poor draftsmanship or the result of the printing.
Our rating: Totally unique, but still a very usable map. Four stars.

(Source: Lebedev Studio’s historical archives of Moscow Metro maps)

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Moscow Metro, 1980

Here’s a beautiful map of the Moscow Metro from 1980 that’s unlike anything else I’ve ever seen. I don’t think it’s an official map, as it looks quite different to other Moscow maps of the same vintage. The archive I found the map in also lists it as “Source Unknown”. It appears to have been printed on the flyleaf of a pocket-sized book, bound to the book’s front cover on the left half, with the fold just to the right of the vertical Orange Line of the map.

Have we been there? No.

What we like: One of the most unique-looking transit maps I’ve ever seen. It looks more like a map of the solar system, with Jupiter-sized interchange stations within the orbit of the Ring Line, smaller satellites (outlying stations) trailing along in their wake. Despite the unusual form, and the renowned complexity of the Moscow system, this still has a nice sense of clarity, simplicity and order to it - this map is still very usable.

What we don’t like: Some absolutely terrible registration on the printing (which appears to be all spot colours - nine different colours in total!). Some fairly crude-looking linework, which may be poor draftsmanship or the result of the printing.

Our rating: Totally unique, but still a very usable map. Four stars.

4 Stars!

(Source: Lebedev Studio’s historical archives of Moscow Metro maps)

Sep 08 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Fahrender Netzplan
Here’s the map for Munich’s S-Bahn network… interestingly placed on the outside of a train. Like the line drawing of Munich’s distinctive skyline.
(Source: NiceBastard/Flickr)

transitmaps:

Fahrender Netzplan

Here’s the map for Munich’s S-Bahn network… interestingly placed on the outside of a train. Like the line drawing of Munich’s distinctive skyline.

(Source: NiceBastard/Flickr)

Sep 08 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Floral Metro Map of Moscow
More gorgeous art with this delightfully arabesque take on the Moscow Metro. Love the almost organic feel to this. This is definitely art and not a usable map, despite the flowing route lines being overlaid on what seems to be an accurate street map.
(Source: Petit Groupe/Flickr)

transitmaps:

Floral Metro Map of Moscow

More gorgeous art with this delightfully arabesque take on the Moscow Metro. Love the almost organic feel to this. This is definitely art and not a usable map, despite the flowing route lines being overlaid on what seems to be an accurate street map.

(Source: Petit Groupe/Flickr)

Jul 22 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Unofficial Map: Circular Map of Oslo’s T-Bane System
We’ve already covered the official Oslo T-Bane map, so it’s interesting to have a look at a completely different take on it; one that takes the “Circle Line” concept to its logical extreme. This piece is the work of Francisco Dans, a design student in London.
Have we been there? No.
What we like: Interesting experiment using arcs and circles, while still maintaining some level of relative placement.
What we don’t like: Adobe Illustrator is pretty unforgiving when it comes to tangential lines, and there’s a few wonky curves and joins in this map, mainly on the pink “5” line. The widening of the interchange stations in the city centre to accomodate the visual conceit of the arcs makes it look like a heck of a walk from one line to another. The line work and type size is probably a little too spindly for use in a real world application.
Our rating: An interesting experiment that looks fun and breezy. Two-and-a-half-stars.

(Source: Francisco’s Minefield Junction website)

transitmaps:

Unofficial Map: Circular Map of Oslo’s T-Bane System

We’ve already covered the official Oslo T-Bane map, so it’s interesting to have a look at a completely different take on it; one that takes the “Circle Line” concept to its logical extreme. This piece is the work of Francisco Dans, a design student in London.

Have we been there? No.

What we like: Interesting experiment using arcs and circles, while still maintaining some level of relative placement.

What we don’t like: Adobe Illustrator is pretty unforgiving when it comes to tangential lines, and there’s a few wonky curves and joins in this map, mainly on the pink “5” line. The widening of the interchange stations in the city centre to accomodate the visual conceit of the arcs makes it look like a heck of a walk from one line to another. The line work and type size is probably a little too spindly for use in a real world application.

Our rating: An interesting experiment that looks fun and breezy. Two-and-a-half-stars.

2.5 Stars

(Source: Francisco’s Minefield Junction website)

Apr 05 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Unofficial Map: Amsterdam Metro and Railway Connections by Eric Hammink
The simplified rectilinear grid is such a familiar form for transit maps that when we see something that breaks that mould, the results can be visually stunning. That’s certainly the case with this beautiful map from designer Erik Hammink, who uses the natural circular shape of Amsterdam’s canals to great effect.
Have we been there? Yes, although I’ve only used the tram network rather than the Metro service.
What we like: Lovely, minimalist European design, with echoes of 1930s Art Deco transit posters in its stylised, circular rendering of the IJ and the Amsterdam Metro type to the top right of the map. Beautifully clear and easy to read. I especially like the rendering of Amsterdam’s ring of canals, which orients the user perfectly.
What we don’t like: The need to adhere to the radial spoke design form means that some of the curves where routes change direction look a little uneven. The icon for Schiphol airport looks very large and out of character compared to the smaller, more elegant icons for the Metro and rail termini stations. The gradients behind the legends at the top of the map look a little modern and iOS-like compared to the beautiful retro feel the rest of the map has.
Our rating: Stunning work, especially when you also know that Eric has also produced a map of Amsterdam’s dense tram network that appears to fit onto the same radial grid. A true labour of love, and it shows. Four stars.

(Source: Hammink Design website - free download for personal use)

transitmaps:

Unofficial Map: Amsterdam Metro and Railway Connections by Eric Hammink

The simplified rectilinear grid is such a familiar form for transit maps that when we see something that breaks that mould, the results can be visually stunning. That’s certainly the case with this beautiful map from designer Erik Hammink, who uses the natural circular shape of Amsterdam’s canals to great effect.

Have we been there? Yes, although I’ve only used the tram network rather than the Metro service.

What we like: Lovely, minimalist European design, with echoes of 1930s Art Deco transit posters in its stylised, circular rendering of the IJ and the Amsterdam Metro type to the top right of the map. Beautifully clear and easy to read. I especially like the rendering of Amsterdam’s ring of canals, which orients the user perfectly.

What we don’t like: The need to adhere to the radial spoke design form means that some of the curves where routes change direction look a little uneven. The icon for Schiphol airport looks very large and out of character compared to the smaller, more elegant icons for the Metro and rail termini stations. The gradients behind the legends at the top of the map look a little modern and iOS-like compared to the beautiful retro feel the rest of the map has.

Our rating: Stunning work, especially when you also know that Eric has also produced a map of Amsterdam’s dense tram network that appears to fit onto the same radial grid. A true labour of love, and it shows. Four stars.

4 Stars!

(Source: Hammink Design website - free download for personal use)

Jan 13 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Unofficial Map: Paris RER Line B as the Eiffel Tower by Sonoko Hagiwara

Words cannot express just how much I love this cleverly thought of, deftly executed and incredibly cute rendering of Paris’ RER Line B as the Eiffel Tower. Hagiwara has drawn her inspiration from the official RER line diagram, with the bifurcation of the line becoming the “legs” of the tower. Almost seems like a clever advertisement for the RER, and only took her 20 minutes to execute!

(Source: Sonoko Hagiwara)

Jan 08 Reblogged

transitmaps:

The Tate Gallery By Tube
Transit Maps’ 100th post! And what better way to celebrate than with one of my all-time favourite pieces of London Tube art. So cleverly done and executed perfectly. By David Booth (no relation!) of The Fine White Line Design, 1986.

transitmaps:

The Tate Gallery By Tube

Transit Maps’ 100th post! And what better way to celebrate than with one of my all-time favourite pieces of London Tube art. So cleverly done and executed perfectly. By David Booth (no relation!) of The Fine White Line Design, 1986.