sofia violet



Apr 12 Reblogged

Third Rail Devblog: Third Rail is a Game That Lets You Redesign the Subway System

transitmaps:

thirdrailgame:

version 0.1

Here’s how it works: Each turn, you build some track and add a new station. And so do your opponents. Because you’re not the only line in town, you have competition. Your goal is to serve as many desirable blocks as possible, while keeping your opponents at bay. How? Well, every piece of track you lay down cannot be crossed. So every turn, you are building walls. The only way through is via stations.

Over time a subway system will develop, its layout determined by how you and your opponents have chosen to play the game.

I would buy this game in a heartbeat.

Mar 26 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Emeliano Ponzi — Subway Map Illustration
Absolutely gorgeous illustration for a May 2011 article in La Repubblica about the power of infographics.
(Source: Emeliano’s website via thisisn’thappiness)

transitmaps:

Emeliano Ponzi — Subway Map Illustration

Absolutely gorgeous illustration for a May 2011 article in La Repubblica about the power of infographics.

(Source: Emeliano’s website via thisisn’thappiness)

Mar 03 Reblogged

transitmaps:

(Back in) Time Tunnel
I love it when people find old transit maps still in situ at stations. This Northern Line map at Embankment dates from sometime prior to 1999 (the year that the Jubilee Line platforms at Charing Cross closed), but is still in place today — this photo was taken on February 21, 2013.
Note also the beautiful 1914 green glazed tiles next to the map.

(Source: stavioni/Flickr)

transitmaps:

(Back in) Time Tunnel

I love it when people find old transit maps still in situ at stations. This Northern Line map at Embankment dates from sometime prior to 1999 (the year that the Jubilee Line platforms at Charing Cross closed), but is still in place today — this photo was taken on February 21, 2013.

Note also the beautiful 1914 green glazed tiles next to the map.

(Source: stavioni/Flickr)

Nov 18 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Metro Magnets!
Super cute stocking stuffer idea from the people at Spacing.ca - magnets that you can arrange to form your own utopian transit system on the door of your fridge. It’s gotta be better than those do it yourself modern poetry magnets…

transitmaps:

Metro Magnets!

Super cute stocking stuffer idea from the people at Spacing.ca - magnets that you can arrange to form your own utopian transit system on the door of your fridge. It’s gotta be better than those do it yourself modern poetry magnets…

Nov 15 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Moscow Metro, 1980
Here’s a beautiful map of the Moscow Metro from 1980 that’s unlike anything else I’ve ever seen. I don’t think it’s an official map, as it looks quite different to other Moscow maps of the same vintage. The archive I found the map in also lists it as “Source Unknown”. It appears to have been printed on the flyleaf of a pocket-sized book, bound to the book’s front cover on the left half, with the fold just to the right of the vertical Orange Line of the map.
Have we been there? No.
What we like: One of the most unique-looking transit maps I’ve ever seen. It looks more like a map of the solar system, with Jupiter-sized interchange stations within the orbit of the Ring Line, smaller satellites (outlying stations) trailing along in their wake. Despite the unusual form, and the renowned complexity of the Moscow system, this still has a nice sense of clarity, simplicity and order to it - this map is still very usable.
What we don’t like: Some absolutely terrible registration on the printing (which appears to be all spot colours - nine different colours in total!). Some fairly crude-looking linework, which may be poor draftsmanship or the result of the printing.
Our rating: Totally unique, but still a very usable map. Four stars.

(Source: Lebedev Studio’s historical archives of Moscow Metro maps)

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Moscow Metro, 1980

Here’s a beautiful map of the Moscow Metro from 1980 that’s unlike anything else I’ve ever seen. I don’t think it’s an official map, as it looks quite different to other Moscow maps of the same vintage. The archive I found the map in also lists it as “Source Unknown”. It appears to have been printed on the flyleaf of a pocket-sized book, bound to the book’s front cover on the left half, with the fold just to the right of the vertical Orange Line of the map.

Have we been there? No.

What we like: One of the most unique-looking transit maps I’ve ever seen. It looks more like a map of the solar system, with Jupiter-sized interchange stations within the orbit of the Ring Line, smaller satellites (outlying stations) trailing along in their wake. Despite the unusual form, and the renowned complexity of the Moscow system, this still has a nice sense of clarity, simplicity and order to it - this map is still very usable.

What we don’t like: Some absolutely terrible registration on the printing (which appears to be all spot colours - nine different colours in total!). Some fairly crude-looking linework, which may be poor draftsmanship or the result of the printing.

Our rating: Totally unique, but still a very usable map. Four stars.

4 Stars!

(Source: Lebedev Studio’s historical archives of Moscow Metro maps)

Sep 08 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Floral Metro Map of Moscow
More gorgeous art with this delightfully arabesque take on the Moscow Metro. Love the almost organic feel to this. This is definitely art and not a usable map, despite the flowing route lines being overlaid on what seems to be an accurate street map.
(Source: Petit Groupe/Flickr)

transitmaps:

Floral Metro Map of Moscow

More gorgeous art with this delightfully arabesque take on the Moscow Metro. Love the almost organic feel to this. This is definitely art and not a usable map, despite the flowing route lines being overlaid on what seems to be an accurate street map.

(Source: Petit Groupe/Flickr)

Aug 16 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Unofficial Map: Boston Subway Time-Scale Map
Peter Dunn from Stonebrown Design sent this map to me this morning for my thoughts, and it’s definitely worth looking at. You may recall that Peter is also responsible for this neat “subway map” of the Appalachian Trail, previously featured on Transit Maps.
Visually, this map reminds me of this unofficial map of Amsterdam’s Metro - mainly because of the unusual radial design and the treatment of bodies of water. However, this map arguably puts that radial design to better use: to represent time from the central “hub” of Boston, allowing a quick and easy visual comparison of journey times.
Have we been there? Yes. However, Lechmere to Government Center took considerably longer than eight minutes when I was using the Green Line.
What we like: The treatment of the four downtown stations - Park, Government Center, State and Downtown Crossing - is beautifully done: it fits the “hub” theme well and looks good doing it.
Map emulates the look of the real Boston map nicely, even though the format is quite different.
Love the statement in the legend: “All times are approximate; your results may vary. Especially on the Green Line.”
What we don’t like: As the map moves further away from the central hub, the time contours start deforming in order to fit things in. This is a pity, because the map works best (and looks better) where the contour lines form proper concentric rings. Compare how the station labels on the Red Line out to Alewife curve neatly with the time contours, while the station labels on the “B” branch of the Green Line don’t really match up with the contours at all.
The contours themselves could perhaps use a few more of their own labels for minutes: you have to scan a long way round from the southern Orange Line to find one!
Our rating: Leaving aside accuracy of the data used to create this map (some of these times do seem a little on the optimistic side, but if that’s what the timetable says…), this is still a very impressive piece of work, and an interesting alternative view of a familiar rapid transit system. I feel the map could look even nicer if the time contours formed concentric rings all the way out - time is a constant, after all! Three-and-a-half stars.

(Source: Stonebrown Design)

transitmaps:

Unofficial Map: Boston Subway Time-Scale Map

Peter Dunn from Stonebrown Design sent this map to me this morning for my thoughts, and it’s definitely worth looking at. You may recall that Peter is also responsible for this neat “subway map” of the Appalachian Trail, previously featured on Transit Maps.

Visually, this map reminds me of this unofficial map of Amsterdam’s Metro - mainly because of the unusual radial design and the treatment of bodies of water. However, this map arguably puts that radial design to better use: to represent time from the central “hub” of Boston, allowing a quick and easy visual comparison of journey times.

Have we been there? Yes. However, Lechmere to Government Center took considerably longer than eight minutes when I was using the Green Line.

What we like: The treatment of the four downtown stations - Park, Government Center, State and Downtown Crossing - is beautifully done: it fits the “hub” theme well and looks good doing it.

Map emulates the look of the real Boston map nicely, even though the format is quite different.

Love the statement in the legend: “All times are approximate; your results may vary. Especially on the Green Line.”

What we don’t like: As the map moves further away from the central hub, the time contours start deforming in order to fit things in. This is a pity, because the map works best (and looks better) where the contour lines form proper concentric rings. Compare how the station labels on the Red Line out to Alewife curve neatly with the time contours, while the station labels on the “B” branch of the Green Line don’t really match up with the contours at all.

The contours themselves could perhaps use a few more of their own labels for minutes: you have to scan a long way round from the southern Orange Line to find one!

Our rating: Leaving aside accuracy of the data used to create this map (some of these times do seem a little on the optimistic side, but if that’s what the timetable says…), this is still a very impressive piece of work, and an interesting alternative view of a familiar rapid transit system. I feel the map could look even nicer if the time contours formed concentric rings all the way out - time is a constant, after all! Three-and-a-half stars.

3.5 Stars

(Source: Stonebrown Design)

Aug 09 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Proposed Extensions of Rapid Transit into Suburban Boston, 1945

Here’s another amazing historical planning map, this time from Boston in 1945. Visually, it looks quite similar to this map, but shows an amazing array of planned extensions to the existing system.

Some of them were built soon after this map was drawn up:the Revere (Blue Line) extension to Wonderland was essentially complete by 1952, although this map shows the line heading even further north. Others took much, much longer: the (Red Line) to Quincy and Braintree wasn’t operational until 1980.

Other lines ended up substantially different to what is shown here: the proposed line east of Harvard takes a circuitous route through East Watertown before ending in Arlington Heights, while others were never built at all, like the extension of the old Everett/Forest Hills elevated line to Dedham.

Interestingly, it looks like there were plans to convert the current Framingham/Worcester commuter rail line into rapid transit: the map shows proposed track emerging from the subway and passing through Trinity Place station (the original name for Back Bay) before heading out towards Auburndale.

Seriously, there are so many interesting things about this map that I can’t list them all here: go take a look at it BIG here.

What we like: Incredible look at ambitious post-war plans for the Boston rapid transit system, especially to compare what got built and what didn’t. The detail is amazing, with each station, bridge, overpass and tunnel being individually and accurately drawn.

What we don’t like: Absolutely nothing. I could look at this for days.

Our rating: 5 stars, duh!

5 Stars!

(Source: Otto Vondrak/Flickr)

Jul 22 Reblogged

transitmaps:

Unofficial Map: Circular Map of Oslo’s T-Bane System
We’ve already covered the official Oslo T-Bane map, so it’s interesting to have a look at a completely different take on it; one that takes the “Circle Line” concept to its logical extreme. This piece is the work of Francisco Dans, a design student in London.
Have we been there? No.
What we like: Interesting experiment using arcs and circles, while still maintaining some level of relative placement.
What we don’t like: Adobe Illustrator is pretty unforgiving when it comes to tangential lines, and there’s a few wonky curves and joins in this map, mainly on the pink “5” line. The widening of the interchange stations in the city centre to accomodate the visual conceit of the arcs makes it look like a heck of a walk from one line to another. The line work and type size is probably a little too spindly for use in a real world application.
Our rating: An interesting experiment that looks fun and breezy. Two-and-a-half-stars.

(Source: Francisco’s Minefield Junction website)

transitmaps:

Unofficial Map: Circular Map of Oslo’s T-Bane System

We’ve already covered the official Oslo T-Bane map, so it’s interesting to have a look at a completely different take on it; one that takes the “Circle Line” concept to its logical extreme. This piece is the work of Francisco Dans, a design student in London.

Have we been there? No.

What we like: Interesting experiment using arcs and circles, while still maintaining some level of relative placement.

What we don’t like: Adobe Illustrator is pretty unforgiving when it comes to tangential lines, and there’s a few wonky curves and joins in this map, mainly on the pink “5” line. The widening of the interchange stations in the city centre to accomodate the visual conceit of the arcs makes it look like a heck of a walk from one line to another. The line work and type size is probably a little too spindly for use in a real world application.

Our rating: An interesting experiment that looks fun and breezy. Two-and-a-half-stars.

2.5 Stars

(Source: Francisco’s Minefield Junction website)

Apr 25 Reblogged

transitmaps:

All Is Fare In Love & Brooklyn
Clearest photo I’ve seen yet of this subway map-themed mural in Brooklyn, New York. Aesthetically, seems to have more in common with the London Tube Map than the subway map of its own city.

transitmaps:

All Is Fare In Love & Brooklyn

Clearest photo I’ve seen yet of this subway map-themed mural in Brooklyn, New York. Aesthetically, seems to have more in common with the London Tube Map than the subway map of its own city.

(Source: brittharris)

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